There’s something about Thai cuisine that makes your taste buds come alive. From the sweet and sour flavors of Pad Thai to the spicy chili peppers in Massaman curry, food from Thailand is one of the best culinary adventures. But with so many different dishes to choose from, it can be hard to know where to start.

Whether you’re planning a trip to Thailand or introducing yourself to their cuisine, we’ve put together a list that names the best dishes that will give you the ultimate taste of Thailand.


The Best Thai Food Bucket List: Names of Popular Dishes to Eat From Thailand Cuisine


1. Fuktong Pad Khai (Pumpkin with Egg)

Fuk Tong Pad Khai is a popular dish from Thailand made mainly with stir-fried pumpkin, eggs, and meat (usually chicken or pork). It goes perfectly well with rice or flat breads like roti/chapati.

What makes this dish a favorite among locals is the unique sweetness of the pumpkin and egg with a hint of spiciness (or none at all) that is sure to please any palate.

Recipe:  Thai Recipe – Fuk-Tong Pad Khai (Stir-Fried Pumpkin With Ege) by 8milesfomhome

Fuktong Pad Khai


2. Gaeng Daeng (Red Curry)

Gaeng Daeng is a traditional Thai curry consisting of red curry paste (made from herbs and spices like red chili peppers, garlic, galangal/Thai ginger, lemongrass, and cumin), meat, and coconut milk.

It is a popular choice for tourists and locals alike, and is one of the most commonly ordered dishes in Thai restaurants. And much like many of Thailand’s dishes, it is also served over steamed rice.

Recipe: Thai Red Curry Recipe (Gang Dang) by Siam Sizzles

Gaeng Daeng


3. Gaeng Hang Lay/Kaeng Hang Le (Northern Thai Curry)

Gaeng Hang Lay is a type of Thai curry originating from Northern Thailand. The dish is made with pork belly and a variety of aromatic spices, and it is often served with steamed rice.

This Thai curry has a unique flavor profile that is both sweet and savory, and it is also relatively mild in terms of heat. While the exact ingredients vary depending on the chef, common additions include lemongrass, galangal, ginger, turmeric, and cumin.

Recipe: Northern Thai Curry Gaeng Hanglay by ImportFood


4. Gaeng Kari/Kaeng Kari (Yellow Curry)

Gaeng Kari, also known as Kaeng Kari, is a Thai curry made with chicken, potatoes, and carrots in a coconut milk-based sauce. Compared to other Thai curries, it is milder and less oily. The dish is typically served with rice or khanom chin (round rice noodles) and can be spiced to taste.

In the southern part of Thailand, they also have their own version of this dish called kaeng som, which is spicier than kaeng kari.

Recipe: Chicken Yellow Curry (Kaeng Kari Kai) Recipe by Leela Punyaratabandhu

Gaeng Kari


5. Gaeng Keow Wan (Green Curry)

Gaeng Keow Wan is a traditional Thai curry typically made with chicken or shrimp. The curry paste is made with green chilies, garlic, lemongrass, shallots, peppercorns, makrut limes, cumin seed, and shrimp paste. It is usually served with rice or noodles.

The dish is said to be the spiciest among other Thai curries because of the green chilis. But thanks to coconut milk, it also has a sweetness to it.

Recipe: Thai Green Beef Curry with Eggplant by Nart

Gaeng Keow Wan


6. Gaeng Massaman (Massaman Curry)

Gaeng Massaman is a Thai curry that is often described as being mild and sweet. The dish gets its name from the Muslim traders who introduced it to Thailand, and it traditionally features beef or chicken simmered in a coconut milk-based sauce.

Gaeng Massaman is typically made with a blend of spices, including cardamom, cloves, cinnamon, and cumin. These spices give the dish its unique flavor, which is further enhanced by the addition of peanuts, potatoes, and onions.

While Gaeng Massaman is not as spicy as the other Thai curries, it is definitely worth seeking out if you are looking for a delicious and flavor-packed meal.

Recipe: Massaman Chicken Curry (Gaeng Massaman Gai) by Emmeline Kemperyd

Gaeng Massaman


7. Gaeng Om (Herbal Curry)

Is it a curry, or is it a broth? While it’s not exactly either of the two, you can say that gaeng om is not your typical Thai dish.

Unlike other curries with lots of ingredients for their pastes, gaeng om only needs five: lemongrass, galangal, chiles, shallots, and garlic. It’s also flexible with the meat you can use, such as pork belly or chicken (or tofu for veggie-lovers). Add in some vegetables like eggplants or squash, and you have a nice, flavorful herbal curry soup that pairs well with rice or grilled meat.

Recipe: Gaeng Om Gai (Isan-Style Herbal Curry with Chicken and Dill) by Derek Lucci


8. Gaeng Panang (Panang Curry)

Gaeng panang is a Thai curry made with juicy pieces of beef or chicken and can be likened as a milder, sweeter version of Thai Red Curry. The panang curry paste used for the dish consists of chili peppers, galangal, lemongrass, kaffir lime, cumin, coriander, and peanuts. It is also one of two Thai curries that use peanuts, the other one being kaeng massaman.

Rice and vegetables go well with the dish, and can be either mild or spicy, depending on your preferences.

Recipe: Thai Chicken Panang Curry by Thai Food Online

Gaeng Panang


9. Gaeng Som/Kaeng Som (Sour Curry/Sour Soup)

Gaeng som is a type of Thai curry made with fish and vegetables and is known for its sour taste, which comes from tamarind (makham). They also use palm sugar to add sweetness to the curry. Southern Thailand has its own spicier version of gaeng som called kaeng lueang.

Unlike most Thai curries, gaeng som does not use coconut milk. Instead, they use a paste called nam phrik kaeng som, which includes shrimp paste, shallots, and chilies, mixed into the water with the other ingredients.

Recipe: Sour Curry w/ Shrimp and Green Papaya (Gaeng Som) by Pailin Chongchitnan

Gaeng Som


10. Gaeng Tai Pla (Fish Kidney Curry)

Gaeng Tai Pla is a dish from Thailand made with three key ingredients: fish, vegetables, and fermented fish paste called tai pla, which is made from catfish or snakehead fish entrails (hence the name). These ingredients are combined to create a spicy, salty, and slightly sweet sauce often used for dipping or to top fresh vegetables. It also pairs perfectly well with steamed rice.

Because of the high sodium in the dish, it is not recommended for people with kidney problems or diabetics.

Recipe: Gaeng Tai Pla by ImportFood

Gaeng Tai Pla


11. Gai Hor Bai Toey (Fried Chicken on Pandan Leaf)

Gai hor bai toey is a Thai dish made of deep-fried marinated boneless chicken wrapped in pandan leaves. It is typically served with rice and a sesame seed-based dipping sauce. The leaves give the meat a unique aroma and taste that blends well with the marinade. It also keeps the chicken moist during cooking.

Gai hor bai toey can be made with either white or dark chicken meat, although thigh meat is generally considered the best choice. In addition to being delicious, gai hor bai toey is also relatively healthy, as it is low in fat and cholesterol.

Recipe: Thai Pandan Leaf Chicken by Recipes are Simple

Gai Hor Bai Toey


12. Gai Pad King (Stir Fried Chicken with Ginger)

Gai pad king is a Thai dish that features chicken, ginger, and mushrooms in a savory sauce. Although it is often served over rice, you can also enjoy it on its own as a delicious and satisfying main course.

The key to making this dish is to choose the right type of mushrooms. While many recipes call for oyster mushrooms, shiitake mushrooms are actually more commonly used in Thailand. You can also garnish your gai pad king with fresh cilantro leaves for added flavor. Bon appetit!

Recipe: Thai Ginger Chicken (Gai Pad King) by Shae’s Mama

Gai Pad King


13. Gai Pad Med Ma Muang (Stir-Fried Chicken with Cashew Nuts)

Gai pad med ma muang is a Thai dish that features stir-fried chicken with roasted cashews and vegetables. Its name literally means “chicken with cashews.” It is a popular dish often served at restaurants and is also a popular choice for take-out.

Gai pad med ma muang is usually made with chicken breast coated with flour, but chicken thigh or drumsticks also work. The coated chicken is then stir-fried along with the cashew, vegetable, and sauces. The result? A flavorful and colorful stir-fry that will leave you asking for more!

Recipe: Thai Cashew Chicken | Gai Pad Med Mamuang by Nart

Gai Pad Med Ma Muang


14. Gai Tod (Fried Chicken)

One of the best street foods in Thailand, gai tod (Thai fried chicken) has captured the hearts of both locals and tourists alike with its light, crispy skin and flavorful meat. It can even serve as an appetizer or as part of a larger meal.

The chicken’s taste is all thanks to a marinade of garlic, coriander seed, ground pepper, chili powder, and salt, which is then mixed with flour, soy sauce, and fish sauce. Once coated, it is deep-fried and served with sweet chili sauce.

Recipe: Thai Fried Chicken by Rachel Cooks Thai

Gai Tod


15. Gai Yang (Grilled Marinated Chicken)

Gai Yang is a popular Thai dish that features marinated grilled chicken. The chicken is typically marinated in lemongrass and fish sauce (two key ingredients), soy sauce, garlic, cilantro, and lime juice. This gives the dish a wonderfully fragrant and flavorful taste.

Gai Yang is often served with sticky rice, dipping sauces, and a variety of fresh vegetables. While it is typically considered to be a street food, it has become increasingly popular in restaurants as well.

Recipe: Grilled Marinated Thai Chicken (Gai Yang)

Gai Yang


16. Goong Ob Woon Sen (Glass Noodles cooked with Shrimp and Soy Sauce)

Goong Ob Woon Sen is a Thai noodle dish often served as street food and enjoyed as a snack or lunch. It is also common to see this dish served at Thai restaurants in the United States.

The dish comprises glass noodles made from mung bean flour, topped with shrimp, and other ingredients like ginger, garlic, Chinese celery leaves, and mushroom.

Recipe: Thai Shrimp and Glass Noodles | Goong Ob by Nat

Goong Ob Woon Sen


17. Goong Pao (Grilled Shrimp)

Goong Pao is a popular Thai food that features grilled giant river prawns. While most people remove the head from shrimps or prawns, for goong pao, it is left in place as it contains flavorful meat and oils that will surely leave you wanting more.

Even though goong pao is treated more like a high-end food, that doesn’t stop people from having a taste of its tender and juicy bits. Some of the best places to enjoy goong pao include Ayutthaya and Bangkok.

Recipe: Spicy Thai Grilled Shrimp by Amy Dong


18. Guay Teow Gai/Kuay Teow Gai (Chicken Noodles)

Guay Teow Gai is a popular Chinese-influenced street food in Thailand, made with chewy rice noodles, chicken, eggs, squid, and lettuce. The dish is usually very filling, and it is a good option for people who are looking for a quick meal. It is also a good choice for anyone looking for something light but tasty.

The dish can be made with different types of noodles, and it can be served with different types of sauces. Guay Teow Gai is a versatile dish that can be customized to suit any taste.

Recipe: Guay Tiew Kua Gai by Pailin Chongchitnant


19. Guay Teow Neua/Kuay Teow Neua (Beef Noodle Soup)

Guay Teow Neua is a type of Thai rice noodle Soup made with beef, rice noodles, and a variety of vegetables. The soup is flavored with spices such as ginger, garlic, and cilantro, and is typically served with a side of lime wedges and fresh herbs.

Recipe: Thai Beef Noodle Soup (Kuay Teaw Nua) by Siam Sizzles

Guay Teow Neua


20. Guay Teow/Kuay Teow (Noodle Soup)

Guay Teow, also known as Kuay Teow, is a popular noodle dish in Thailand. The soup consists of rice noodles, chicken, fish balls, and vegetables cooked in a light soy sauce mix.

Guay Teow is often served with a side of sliced chilies or fish sauce, and it can be found at most Thai restaurants. While the dish may seem simple, it is actually quite flavorful and filling.


21. Hoi Tod /Hoy Tod (Crispy Oyster Omelette)

Hoi tod is a Thai dish that is typically made with seafood and is also a popular street food in Thailand. The word “hoi” means “oyster” (or mussels), and “tod” means “fried.” As a result, hoi tod is usually made with oysters fried in a light batter, which looks like an oyster omelet/mussel pancake. However, the dish can also be made with other types of seafood, such as shrimp or scallops.

In addition to seafood, hoi tod often includes vegetables like onions, carrots, and celery. The dish is typically served with a sweet and sour sauce, and it can be garnished with spring onions and coriander.

Recipe: Crispy oyster omelette (hoy tod) by Sareen Rojanametin, Jean Thamthanakorn

Hoi Tod


22. Hor Mok Ma Prow Awn (Seafood Coconut Curry)

Hor mok ma prow awn is a Thai seafood curry traditionally scooped into a young coconut shell. The curry consists of fish and seafood, red curry paste, kaffir lime leaves, galangal, fish sauce, basil, sugar, and coconut cream (its most distinguished flavor).

You can sprinkle some red chilies and kaffir lime leaves on top when serving the dish. It also pairs well with jasmine rice. With its rich flavor and creamy texture, hor mok ma prow awn is sure to become a new favorite.


23. Jok/Joke (Rice Porridge)

Jok is a type of Thai porridge made from rice and water, and is one of the most popular breakfast foods in Thailand. It is often served with pork meatballs, and it can be flavored with ginger, garlic, and green onions.

Because it is high in carbohydrates, Jok provides a slow and steady release of energy, making it ideal for people engaged in strenuous activity. In addition, the rice in Jok helps to absorb excess oil and spices from other dishes, making it a perfect food for those looking to cut down on fat intake.

Recipe: Jok Recipe by Fearless Eating

Jok/Joke


24. Kai Jeow (Thai Omelet)

Thai cuisine is world-famous for its unique flavors and ingredients, and Kai Jeow is a simple dish that exemplifies the best of what Thai food has to offer.

At the most basic level, kai jeow is a type of omelet which has two key ingredients: eggs and fish sauce, giving the dish its characteristic flavor. Some variations also include pork, shrimp, crabmeat, or Thai chilies.

Kai Jeow is often served with rice or rice porridge, and it can be eaten as a main dish or as a side dish. Whether you’re looking for a hearty meal or a light snack, Kai Jeow is an excellent choice.

Recipe: Thai Omelette (Kai Jeow) by Nart

Kai Jeow


25. Kai Yad Sai (Stuffed Omelet)

Another Thai omelet that will surely delight your taste buds is kai yad sai, which is an omelet stuffed with ground beef and vegetables. What’s more is that the dish is quick and easy to make at home while also being flavorful and filling, making it a perfect meal to have any time of the day!

Recipe: Thai Pork Stuffed Omelette (Kai Yad Sai) Recipe by Siam Sizzles

Kai Yad Sai


26. Khanom Jeen Nam Ya Kati (Coconut Milk Curry w/ Rice Noodles)

Khanom jeen nam ya kati is a dish that combines two elements: khanom jeen noodles and nam ya kati curry.

Khanom jeen is a type of Thai noodle made from fermented rice. It is thin and white, with a slightly chewy texture. It is usually served in a soup or curry, and it is often topped with vegetables, meat, or fish.

Nam ya kati curry is made from minced boiled fish meat cooked with a coconut-based sauce of herbs, spices, and coconut milk.

This dish can be quite spicy, so be sure to add additional chili peppers if you like your food on the hot side. You can also garnish it with soft-boiled eggs and other vegetables like cucumbers or bean sprouts.


27. Khao Kha Mu/Kha Mu (Pork Leg Rice/Soy Sauce Pork)

Khao Kha Mu is a variety of Thai sweet pork leg that is often served over rice. The pork leg is braised in a mixture of soy sauce, sugar, and fish sauce until it is melt-in-your-mouth tender. It is typically served with a side of pickled mustard greens and hard-boiled eggs.

Its sweet and salty taste, combined with the soft pork, makes it one of the definite must-try Thailand rice dishes for your bucket list.

Recipe: How to Make Khao Kha Moo by Thai Cook Book

Khao Kha Mu


28. Khao Klukh Krapi/Khao Kluk Kapi (Rice with Shrimp Paste)

Khao Klukh Krapi, or Khao Kluk Kapi, is a traditional Thai dish consisting of fried rice and shrimp paste. The rice is first cooked in a wok or skillet, then stir-fried with the shrimp paste and other ingredients. The dish is often garnished with fried shallots, shrimp, sliced green mangoes, lime wedges, omelet, and cucumber.

With a salty shrimp taste and side dishes that add different flavors, it’s no wonder it’s a popular dish for everyday eating and special occasions.

Recipe: Khao Klukh Krapi (Rice with Shrimp Paste) Recipe by Chef Veena Arora


29. Khao Mok Gai (Thai Chicken Biryani)

Khao mok gai is a Thai dish that consists of rice and chicken. The chicken is usually marinated in a blend of spices and then fried or roasted. The rice is then cooked in the chicken juices, resulting in a fragrant and flavorful dish.

Khao mok gai is often served with a variety of condiments, such as cucumber and tomato slices, sweet-and-sour spicy dipping sauce, and topped with fried shallots.

Recipe: Khao Mok Gai – Thai Chicken with Rice (aka Thai Chicken Biryani Rice) by Phasinee Doddeo

Khao Mok Gai


30. Khao Moo Daeng (Red Pork w/ Red Sauce)

Khao Moo Daeng (which literally means ‘red rice’) is a Thai dish made of red pork that has been marinated and then grilled. The pork is usually served with a sweet chili sauce, rice, and cucumber. And to give the dish its unique taste, a ‘special’ gravy sauce is poured on top of the pork.

This tasty rice dish is also a popular street food in Thailand which you can find at most markets and food stalls. While you typically make the dish with leaner cuts of pork, some restaurants use higher quality cuts of pork for a more luxurious meal.

Recipe: Thai Red Pork With Rice by ImportFood

Khao Moo Daeng


31. Khao Moo Tod Gratiem (Deep Fried Pork)

Khao Moo Tod Gratiem is a type of Thai fried rice made with stir-fried marinated pork and crispy fried garlic. It is often served with a side of sweet chili sauce or fish sauce.

While the dish is popular in Thai home cooking, you can also find it in almost every street stall and restaurant in Thailand.


32. Khao Na Bpet (Red Roast Duck on Rice)

Khao Na Bpet is a popular Thai dish that consists of roasted duck slices, rice, and spices, drizzled with sauce on top. It is often served with a side of vegetables like pickled cucumbers and soy sauce with sliced chili peppers as a condiment. You can also add some chili flakes to make it more spicy.

Khao Na Bpet


33. Khao Neow Moo Ping (Grilled Pork with Sticky Rice)

Khao neow moo ping is a popular Thai dish consisting of grilled pork skewers served with sticky rice which is usually eaten by hand. The pork is marinated in a sweet, savory sauce made with soy sauce, honey/sugar, and spices, then grilled to perfection.

Khao neow moo ping is typically eaten for lunch or dinner, but it can also make a delicious snack and can be found at almost every street stall.

Recipe: Khao Niaow Moo Ping (Pork Skewer with Sticky Rice) by Phol Tantasathien

Khao Neow Moo Ping


34. Khao Niew Mamuang (Mango and Sticky Rice)

Khao niew mamuang, also sometimes called sticky rice mango, is a Thai dessert that consists of glutinous rice, fresh mango, and coconut milk. The dish is usually served at room temperature or slightly warm, and the rice is often steamed in a banana leaf to give it a subtle flavor.

Khao niew mamuang is a popular choice for parties and special occasions, as it is both delicious and beautiful to look at.

Recipe: Khao Niew Ma Muang (Mango Sticky Rice) by PunchFork

Khao Niew Mamuang


35. Khao Pad (Fried Rice)

Khao pad is a popular dish in Thailand that typically consists of rice fried with eggs, vegetables, and sometimes meat or seafood. The rice is typically seasoned with soy sauce, fish sauce, and other flavorings, giving it a savory flavor that many people enjoy.

Khao pad is a relatively simple dish to make, but it can be quite filling and satisfying. In addition, it is often served with a side of cucumber slices or salad, making it a well-rounded meal.

Recipe: Khao Pad (Thai Style Fried Rice) by MsBindy


36. Khao Pad Tom Yum (Tom Yum Fried Rice)

Khao Pad Tom Yum is a type of Thai fried rice made with tomatoes, chili peppers, and lemongrass. It is often served with a variety of meats, seafood, or vegetables. The dish gets its name from the Tom Yum soup, which is a popular Thai soup that is also made with these same ingredients.

Khao Pad Tom Yum is usually cooked in a wok over high heat, so it has a light and crispy texture. The rice is also typically seasoned with fish sauce, oyster sauce, or soy sauce. This dish is typically garnished with cilantro and lime juice before being served.

Recipe: Tom Yum Fried Rice (Khao Pad Tom Yum) by Asian Inspirations

Khao Pad Tom Yum


37. Khao Soi (Creamy Coconut Curry Noodle Soup)

Khao soi is a traditional Thai dish that is made with egg noodles, chicken, and coconut curry soup. The soup is usually served with a side of pickled cabbage, lime wedges, and chili flakes. It is typically a bit sweet and very flavorful.

It’s very popular in the northern Thailand region, and you can find it at many of the restaurants in Chiang Mai.

Recipe: Chicken Khao Soi by Sarah

Khao Soi


38. Kluai Buat Chi (Bananas In Coconut Milk)

Bananas are a popular ingredient in Thai cuisine, and are used in sweet and savory dishes. Kluai Buat Chi is just one example of how you can use bananas to create delicious and exotic flavors.

Kluai Buat Chi is a traditional Thai dessert made from bananas in coconut milk served as a side dish or snack. The dessert is made by boiling ripe bananas in coconut milk, water, and sugar, and cooked until thick and creamy.

Recipe: Kluai Buat Chi (Thai Bananas in Coconut Milk) by Asian Food Network

Kluai Buat Chi


39. Kua Kling (Dry Curry)

Kua Kling is a traditional Thai dish that typically features ground chicken or pork cooked in a dry curry paste and is really spicy. The dish is incredibly flavorful, with a complex blend of spices that may include lemongrass, galangal, kaffir lime leaves, and cumin.

Kua Kling is often served with rice, but it can also be enjoyed on its own as an appetizer or side dish. While the exact ingredients vary depending on the region and cook, Kua Kling is always packed with flavor and makes an excellent addition to any meal.

Recipe: Khua Kling Gai (Southern Thai Dry Curry With Minced Chicken) Recipe by Derek Lucci

Kua Kling


40. Kuay Teow Lui Suan (Thai Spring Rolls with Herbs)

Kuay teow lui suan are Thai spring rolls made with herbs, vegetables, and ground pork wrapped in rice paper sheets. The herbs commonly used in this dish include cilantro, basil, and Thai chili pepper. The vegetables typically used are lettuce, carrots, and cucumber.

Kuay teow lui suan can be served as a main dish or side dish, with a dipping sauce such as peanut sauce or sweet chili sauce. Kuay teow lui suan is a refreshing and light dish that is perfect for summertime.

Recipe: Vegan Thai-Style Spring Rolls by Jolinda Hackett 

Kuay Teow Lui Suan


41. Kuay Teow Reua (Thai Boat Noodles)

Kuay teow reua is a Thai soup often referred to as “boat noodles.” The dish gets its name from the small bowls used to serve them traditionally, which are similar in size to the bowls used on Vietnamese rice boats.

Kuay teow reua is typically made with sen lek (a type of rice noodle), beef or pork meat, cilantro, bean sprouts, and other vegetables. The soup is flavored with a savory beef or pork broth and a spoonful of beef/pork blood (or coconut milk), topped with a sprinkle of fried garlic. You can also eat it with a side of fried pork rinds.

Recipe: Thai Beef Noodle Soup (Kuay Teaw Nua) by Siam Sizzles

Kuay Teow Reua


42. Kuay Teow Tom Yum (Thai Sweet and Sour Soup Noodles)

Thai sweet and sour soup noodles, or kuay teow tom yum, is a Thai dish that combines the flavors of sweet, sour, and spice. The soup is made with egg noodles, vegetables, and ground pork (or chicken). You can use fish sauce, lime juice, chili vinegar, and fried garlic to add more flavor.

While the exact ingredients vary depending on the chef, kuay teow tom yum is typically a hearty and flavor-packed soup that is perfect for a winter meal.


43. Laab/Larb (Spicy Salad)

Laab is a traditional Thai dish that typically features sauteed ground meat (usually chicken, pork, or beef) mixed with kao kua (toasted rice powder) and other spices and herbs. The dish is often served with sticky rice, but you can also eat it on its own as a spicy salad.

Laab is a popular choice for both home cooks and professional chefs since it is relatively easy to make and can be customized to suit any taste. While the exact ingredients vary depending on the region and personal preference, some of the most common components of laab include lemongrass, chili peppers, fish sauce, and mint leaves.

Recipe: Thai Larb Salad by Sylvia Fountaine


44. Larb Moo (Minced Pork Salad)

Larb moo is a traditional Thai dish that features minced pork (moo) that is cooked with kao kua (toasted rice powder) and other spices and herbs. The dish is typically served with sticky rice and crunchy veggies, but you can also enjoy it on its own as a light meal or snack. While the exact ingredients can vary depending on the region or cook, common ones include chili peppers, lemongrass, fish sauce, lime juice, and mint leaves.

Larb moo is typically a vibrant dish – both in flavor and appearance – and is sure to please any palate.

Recipe: Laab Moo Isan (Thai Isan-Style Minced Pork Salad) by Derek Lucci

Larb Moo


45. Moo Dat Diew (Dried and Fried Pork)

Moo dat diew is a traditional Thai pork jerky that is mostly seen on the street food carts in Thailand. It consists of sliced pork pieces marinated in soy sauce, fish sauce, garlic, and sugar. The marinated pork pieces are then sun-dried and then deep-fried or grilled afterwards.

You can enjoy the dish on its own with some sweet and spicy chili sauce, or you can serve it on a banana leaf with sliced cucumbers and sticky rice. The mix of textures and flavors makes it a popular choice for locals and tourists alike.


46. Moo Ping (Barbequed Marinated Pork Skewers)

Moo ping is a type of Thai grilled pork that is popular as a street food snack. It is made by marinating bite-sized pieces of pork in a sweet and savory sauce, then grilling them until they are cooked through. The pork is often served on skewers, making it easy to eat on the go. You can also eat it with sticky rice, turning the dish into khao neow moo ping.

Moo ping is typically served with a dipping sauce, such as a sweet chili sauce, and it can be enjoyed as part of a meal or as a standalone snack.

Recipe: BBQ Pork Skewers หมูปิ้ง (moo ping) by Pailin Chongchitnant

Moo Ping


47. Moo Satay (Pork Satay)

Moo satay is a popular Thai street food consisting of grilled skewers of marinated pork. The pork is typically made with shoulder or loin cuts, although there are also beef and chicken versions of moo satay.

The meat is first marinated in a mixture of soy sauce, fish sauce, garlic, and palm sugar before being grilled over charcoal.

Once grilled, the moo satay is served with white toast, ajaad (Thai cucumber relish), and peanut sauce.

Recipe: Thai Pork Satay by ImportFood

Moo Satay


48. Mu Kratha/Moo Gata (Thai Barbecue)

Can’t decide between barbecues and hot pot? Why not have them both? Mu kratha is a style of cooking in Thailand that resembles a Korean barbecue and Chinese hotpot in one.

You grill the sliced meats (usually pork) in the middle part of the grill pan, and the vegetables, seafood, and other ingredients cook in the hotpot surrounding the center. In Thailand, they also serve it with nam chim suki, which is a spicy chili dipping sauce.

Mu Kratha


49. Nam Prik Goong Sot (Shrimp Sauce)

Nam prik goong sot is a type of nam prik (spicy Thai dip) traditionally made with shrimp, chili peppers, and other spices. It is typically served as part of a bigger meal with rice and vegetables.

While nam prik is not as well-known as Thai curries or noodles (outside of Thailand at least), it is an essential part of Thai cuisine that you should try once you get the chance.


50. Nam Prik Kaphi (Shrimp Paste Sauce w/ Vegetables)

Nam prik kaphi is a spicy Thai dip that is popular both in Thailand and abroad. It consists of chili paste made with different ingredients, including garlic, chilies, lime juice, and fermented shrimp paste (kaphi). All of these are pounded in a mortar and pestle (or a food processor) until it has a semi-smooth consistency.

Nam prik kaphi can be served with different dishes, such as steamed vegetables, fried fish, or rice. It can also be used as a dipping sauce for spring rolls or other snacks. Whether you’re in Thailand or not, Nam prik kaphi is definitely something worth trying!

Recipe: Thai Shrimp Paste Chilli Dipping Sauce (Nam Prik Kapi) by  Siam Sizzles


51. Nam Tok Moo (Grilled Pork Salad)

Nam tok moo is a traditional Thai meat salad consisting of thinly-sliced marinated pork steak mixed with different herbs and veggies like mint leaves and cabbage and served with sticky rice.

The pork is marinated in a mixture of fish sauce, soy sauce, and spices before grilling. After that, different herbs and greens are mixed in. The result is a spicy and flavorful meat salad that will surely make your tummy happy.

Recipe: Moo Nam Tok (Grilled Pork Salad) Recipe by Alice Grey

Nam Tok Moo


52. Pad Kee Mao Sen Yai (Drunken Noodles)

Pad Kee Mao Sen Yai is a popular Thai dish with an equally fascinating story. It is said that drunk people, not knowing the noodles are spicy, begin to sober up once they realize how hot it is, which is why it is also called ‘drunken noodles.’

The dish is made with wide rice noodles, vegetables, and protein, and it is often served with a spicy sauce. The vegetables commonly used in the dish include onion, bell pepper, and broccoli. The wide rice noodles help to absorb the sauce, making for a flavorful and filling meal.

Pad Kee Mao Sen Yai is typically served with a chili-based sauce, but it can also be made with a sweet and sour sauce.

Recipe: Thai Drunken Noodles (Pad Kee Mao) by Nagi

Pad Kee Mao Sen Yai


53. Pad Kra Pao Moo (Stir-Fried Basil and Pork)

Pad Kra Pao Moo is a dish from Thailand that is typically made with pork. The pork is stir-fried with holy basil, chilies, and garlic. Sometimes other vegetables, such as eggplant or peppers, are added to the dish. The result is a flavorful and spicy dish that pairs well with jasmine rice.

Pad Kra Pao Moo is a popular dish in Thai restaurants, but it is also relatively easy to make at home.

Recipe: Pad Kra Pao Moo- Spicy Thai Basil Pork by Renee


54. Pad Kra Prao/Pad Gaprao (Fried Basil Chicken)

Pad Kra Prao, or Pad Gaprao, is a popular dish in Thailand made with chicken, garlic, chili peppers, and holy basil. The name literally means “Stir-fried with Holy Basil.” This stir-fry food is often served with rice, and can be made with other meats such as pork or beef.

Pad Kra Prao is a simple dish to make, but it packs a lot of flavors. The combination of garlic, chili peppers, and holy basil creates a unique taste that is both spicy and aromatic.

Recipe: Pad Gaprao (Pad Kra Pao) Holy Basil Chicken Stir-Fry by Pailin Chongchitnant


55. Pad Pak Grachet (Water Mimosa)

Stir-fried Water Mimosa or Pad Pak Gachet is one of Thailand’s most famous dishes. It is a stir-fried mix of water mimosa, chili, and different sauces. You can also add in some meat like pork or chicken for protein.

The stalk and leaves of the water mimosa add a crunchy and chewy texture to the dish that draws people in, and the light oyster sauce only adds more to the flavor.

Recipe: Pad Pak Gachet Recipe by gardenia

Pad Pak Grachet


56. Pad Pak Ruam Mit (Stir Fried Vegetables)

Pad Pak Ruam Mit is a Thai dish often served as a side dish or to add more veggies to the table. It is made by stir-frying vegetables in a wok with a variety of seasonings. The most common vegetables used in Pad Pak Ruam Mit are mushrooms, carrots, and onions. However, other vegetables can also be used, such as broccoli, cabbage, and peppers. The dish is usually seasoned with oyster sauce, soy sauce, and fish sauce, giving it a savory umami flavor.

Pad Pak Ruam Mit is a quick and easy dish to make, and it is a healthy option for those looking to add more vegetables to their diet. It can be served on its own or with rice.

Recipe: Thai Stir Fried Mixed Vegetables Recipe (Pad Pak Ruammit) by Siam Sizzles


57. Pad Phet Pla Duk Tod (Spicy Fried Catfish)

Pad phet pla duk tod is a fried fish dish from Thailand that is often served with rice. The dish gets its name from its two main ingredients: catfish and red curry paste.

The catfish is usually deep-fried, which gives it a crispy exterior and a moist, flaky interior. Various herbs and spices make up the red curry paste, such as red chili peppers, lemongrass, and kaffir lime leaves.

This dish is typically very hearty and filling, but it can also be quite spicy. If you are sensitive to spice, you may want to order it with extra coconut milk or ask for the curry paste to be mild.

Pad Phet Pla Duk Tod


58. Pad Phuk Tong (Stir-Fried Pumpkin)

Stir-fried pumpkin, or pad phuk tong in Thai, is a delicious and easy-to-make dish. It is often made with either chicken or pork, but can also be made vegetarian. The key ingredients are pumpkin, garlic, and oyster sauce. The pumpkin is first stir-fried with the garlic, then the oyster sauce is added at the end.

This dish is typically served with rice and a side of vegetables. It is a quick and simple meal that can be enjoyed any day of the week.

Recipe: Thai Stir-Fried Pumpkin, ‘Pad Phuk Tong’ by ImportFood

Pad Phuk Tong


59. Pad Sataw (Stink Beans)

Pad sataw is a dish from southern Thailand made of stink/bitter beans (sataw) stir-fried with coconut milk and curry paste and then seasoned with different spices. In addition to stink/bitter beans, it typically contains garlic, chili peppers, and shrimp paste.

The dish is often considered to be one of the few examples of Thai cuisine that is relatively mild in spice, making it a popular choice for those who are not used to eating spicy food.

Recipe: Thai Stink Beans with Shrimp Recipe by eatingthaifood


60. Pad See Ew (Thick Noodle Dish)

Pad see ew is a popular Thai street food made with rice noodles, chicken, and vegetables. The noodles are stir-fried with light and dark soy sauce, and the vegetables are typically bok choy or Chinese broccoli.

Pad see ew is often served with a wedge of lime and chili peppers, which can be used to adjust the level of spice. While it is not the most famous Thai dish, it is definitely one of the most beloved.

Recipe: Pad See Ew (Thai Stir Fried Noodles) by Nagi

Pad See Ew


61. Pad Thai (Stir-Fried Noodles)

Pad Thai is a type of Thai noodle dish that is typically made with rice noodles, vegetables, and protein. The most common protein used in Pad Thai is chicken, but shrimp and tofu are also popular options. The noodles are stir-fried with a sauce made of tamarind paste, fish sauce, brown sugar, and chili peppers. Toasted peanuts, cilantro, and lime juice are often added as toppings.

While Pad Thai is often considered to be a national dish of Thailand, it is actually relatively new to the country. The dish was created in the 1930s as part of a campaign to promote nationalism, and stir-fried noodles quickly became popular.

Recipe: Pad Thai by Nagi

Pad Thai


62. Pad Yord Mala (Melon Leaves)

Pad Yord Mala is a Thai dish made with bitter melon leaves stir-fried with oyster sauce and garlic and served over rice. This creates a unique mix of bitter and savory flavors that will get you hooked after a few bites.

Aside from its unique taste, the bitter melon leaves also give numerous health benefits like lower blood sugar and decreased cholesterol levels.


63. Pak Boong (Morning Glory)

Pak boong, also known as morning glory or water spinach, is a popular vegetable in Thailand. It is often used in stir-fries and soups, and has a crunchy texture and slightly sweet flavor.

Pak boong is also a good source of vitamins A and C, as well as iron and calcium. It is also low in calories and fat-free.

In addition to being eaten cooked, pak boong can also be used as a garnish or added to salads.

Recipe: Authentic Thai Recipe for Stir Fried Morning Glory byThai Cook Book 

Pak Boong


64. Pla Chon Lui Suan (Snake Head Fish with Vegetables)

Pla Chon Lui Suan is a traditional Thai dish that originates from the central region of Thailand. The dish is made with a type of freshwater fish called pla chon (snakehead), which is why it is sometimes also referred to as pla chon lui suan. The fish is fried and topped off with a mix of vegetables, herbs, spices, and sauces and pairs well with liquors.


65. Pla Kapong Neung Manao (Steamed Lime Fish)

Pla Kapong Neung Manao is a traditional Thai dish that is made with steamed fish and a tangy lime-based sauce. The dish is typically served with rice, but it can also be enjoyed on its own.

While there are many different ways to make Pla Kapong Neung Manao, the key ingredients are usually the same: fish, lime juice, ginger, garlic, fish sauce, and sugar. This combination of flavors results in a dish that is both flavorful and refreshing.

Recipe: Steamed Fish With Lime and Garlic Recipe by eatingthaifood

Pla Kapong Neung Manao


66. Pla Pao (Grilled Fish)

Thai grilled fish, or pla pao, is a popular dish in Thai cuisine. The fish is marinated in a mixture of spices and then grilled over charcoal. Thai grilled fish is often served with seafood dipping sauce, and it can be made with either fresh or saltwater fish.

While Thai grilled fish is typically made with carp or catfish, it can also be made with other types of fish, such as tilapia or salmon. Thai grilled fish is a nutritious and delicious meal that can be enjoyed by people of all ages.

Recipe: Authentic Thai Grilled Fish Recipe by eatingthaifood

Pla Pao


67. Radna/Rat Na (Noodles with Gravy)

Radna/Rat Na is a popular lunch/dinner Thai dish that consists of rice noodles, vegetables, and meat or seafood. The name of the dish comes from the words ‘rad’ (to pour sauce over something) and ‘na’ (top/face) and refers to the way sauce/gravy is poured over the noodles before serving.

The dish is typically made with chicken or shrimp, but it can also be made with beef or pork. Radna/Rat Na is usually served with a spicy and sour condiment called prik nam som (pickled chilies in vinegar) and chili flakes.

Recipe: Rad Na (rice noodles with gravy) by Pailin Chongchitnant


68. Sai Oua (Northern Thai Sausage)

Northern Thai sausage, or sai oua, is a type of pork sausage that is popular in Laos and Northern Thailand. It is made with ground pork, turmeric, chili peppers, galangal, lemongrass, shallots, garlic, and fish sauce. The sausages are typically grilled or fried and served with sticky rice and dipping sauces.

Northern Thai sausage is often used as an ingredient in other dishes, such as laab (a type of minced meat salad) or khao soi (a coconut curry noodle soup). While Northern Thai sausage can be found at some Asian markets, it is relatively easy to make at home.

Recipe: Northern Thai Sausage Recipe (Sai Oua) by Siam Sizzles

Sai Oua


69. Som Tam (Spicy Green Papaya Salad)

Som tam, also known as papaya salad, is a dish originating from Thailand that has gained popularity in recent years. The salad is traditionally made with shredded green papaya, fish sauce, palm sugar, lime juice, chili peppers, and garlic. However, there are many variations of the dish, and ingredients such as carrots, tomatoes, green beans, and peanuts are often added.

Recipe: Thai Green Papaya Salad (som tum) by Pailin Chongchitnant

Som Tam


70. Som Tam Ponlamai (Spicy Fruit Salad)

Som Tam Ponlamai is a simple yet delicious salad from Thailand that combines the flavors of sour, sweet, salty, and spicy. The dish is traditionally made with green papaya, but it can also be made with other fruits and vegetables like mango, pineapple, or cucumber.

To make Som Tam Ponlamai, the fruit or vegetable is first shredded or cut into thin strips. The dressing is made with fish sauce, palm sugar, chili peppers, and lime juice. It is then poured over the shredded fruit or vegetable, and mostly served with sticky rice.


71. Suki Haeng (Dry Sukiyaki)

Suki haeng, also known as a “dry” Thai-style hot pot, is a popular dish in Thailand that is typically made with chicken or shrimp. The meat is cooked with different leafy greens like cabbage and suki sauce. And since this is a one-dish meal, you can enjoy it on its own.

Suki haeng is often considered a healthy alternative to more hearty hot pot dishes since it is relatively light and refreshing. In addition, it is typically low in calories, making it an excellent option for those looking to lose weight or eat healthier.

Recipe: Fried Suki Glass Noodles (Suki Haeng) by Siam Sizzles

Suki Haeng


72. Thai Pineapple Rice

Have you ever had Thai pineapple rice? If not, you’re in for a treat! Thai pineapple rice is a delicious and easy-to-make dish that is perfect for any occasion. The best part about it is that it only takes a few minutes to prepare.

All you need is some cooked rice, fresh pineapple, and a few pantry staples like soy sauce, fish sauce, and lime juice.

Recipe: Pineapple Fried Rice (Thai) by Nagi

Thai Pineapple Rice


73. Tom Kha Gai (Chicken in Coconut Soup)

Tom Kha Gai is a famous Thai soup made with chicken, galangal (a type of ginger), lemongrass, and coconut milk. What’s also great about this dish is you can easily make it at home, plus it’s also a fantastic soup to serve to people new to Thai cuisine. It is usually flavored with fish sauce, lime juice, and chili peppers and served with rice or noodles.

Recipe: Best Ever Tom Kha Gai Soup (Thai Coconut Chicken Soup) by Cheryl Malik

Tom Kha Ga


74. Tom Saap (Isaan Soup)

Isaan soup, or Tom Saap, is a popular dish from the Isaan region of Thailand. The soup is typically made with pork ribs, vegetables, and spices, and it is often served with rice. It is usually considered a hearty and filling dish and often eaten as a main meal.

While the exact ingredients and preparation vary from family to family, some common elements are typically used in Isaan soup recipes. These include lemongrass, galangal, kaffir lime leaves, and fish sauce.

Recipe: Tom Saap by Fearless Eating

Tom Saap


75. Tom Yum Goong (Spicy Shrimp Soup)

Tom Yum Goong is a popular Thai soup that is known for its sour, spicy, and fragrant flavors. The soup is typically made with a variety of fresh ingredients, including lemongrass, galangal, kaffir lime leaves, and chili peppers. These ingredients are pounded together to create a paste, which is then used to flavor the soup.

Tom Yum Goong is made with shrimp (goong) and is often served with rice or rice noodles. While the exact origins of Tom Yum Goong are unknown, the soup has become a popular dish in Thailand and around the world.

Recipe: Tom Yum Soup (Tom Yum Goong) Recipe by Pailin Chongchitnant

Tom Yum Goon


76. Tom Yum/Tom Yam (Spicy Soup)

Tom Yum/Tom Yam is a popular type of Thai soup that is characterized by its hot and sour flavor. The soup is traditionally made with pork or shrimp, but there are also vegetarian versions available. The soup is typically made with various fresh ingredients, including lemongrass, galangal, kaffir lime leaves, chili peppers, and fish sauce. These ingredients give the soup its distinct flavor and make it a favorite among Thai food lovers.

In addition to being delicious, Tom Yum/Tom Yam is also believed to have medicinal properties. The soup is thought to help boost immunity and fight off infection. For these reasons, Tom Yum/Tom Yam is often enjoyed when people are feeling under the weather.

Recipe: Tom Yum Soup (Thai soup) by Nagi


77. Yam Kai Dao (Fried Egg Salad)

Yam kai dao is a traditional Thai dish that can be enjoyed as either a side or a main course. It is made by frying chicken or duck eggs Thai style and mixing it with veggies and dressing. The dish gets its name from the Thai words yam (a type of salad) and kai dao (fried egg/star egg).

Yam kai dao is not something you often see at Thai restaurants, but you can easily make it at home since the ingredients are simple. Whether you order it in a restaurant or cook it yourself, yam kai dao is sure to be a delicious addition to your meal.

Recipe: Yam Khai Dao (Thai Fried Egg Salad) Recipe by Derek Lucci

Yam Kai Dao


78. Yam Kaw Moo Yang (Grilled Pork Neck Salad)

Yam kaw moo yang is a Thai grilled pork dish often served as an appetizer or main course. It consists of thinly sliced pork marinated in a mixture of oyster sauce, fish sauce, and other seasonings. The pork is then grilled until it is cooked through and slightly charred. Yam kaw moo yang is typically served with a dipping sauce or salad on the side.

Yam Kaw Moo Yang


79. Yam Nua (Beef Salad)

Beef is a common ingredient in Yam Nua, a beef salad dish from Thailand, as it is a good source of protein and cooks quickly. The salad also includes ingredients like onions, Chinese celery, toasted rice powder, and fish sauce that help add flavor and texture.

Yam Nua is typically served with lime wedges and rice, but you can also pair it with noodles or bread.

Recipe: Yum Nua by Nok Suantaranon

Yam Nua


80. Yam Pla Dook Foo (Fried Catfish with Green Mango Salad)

Fried catfish with green mango salad, or Yam Pla Dook Foo, is a popular dish in Thailand. The dish is made by frying catfish and then tossing it with a green mango salad.

The salad includes green mangoes, shallots, cilantro, chili peppers, and fish sauce. Fried catfish is a usual dish in Thailand, but the addition of the green mango salad makes Yam Pla Dook Foo unique. The dish is often served with jasmine rice and a lime wedge.

Recipe: Crispy Fluffy Fish w/ Green Mango Salad by Pailin Chongchitnant  

Yam Pla Dook Foo


81. Yam Takrai Goong Sot (Shrimp Lemongrass Salad)

Yam takrai goong sot is a traditional Thai dish that typically features shrimp, lemongrass, toasted cashews, coriander leaves, and coconut milk. The name of the dish comes from the Thai words for shrimp (goong) and lemongrass (takrai).

The dish is typically served with lettuce and sliced cucumbers, and it is often garnished with fresh cilantro or green onions.

Yam Takrai Goong Sot


82. Yam Talay (Spicy Seafood Salad)

Yam Talay is a traditional Thai dish that typically includes a variety of seafood, vegetables, and herbs. The flavor profile of Yam Talay varies depending on the ingredients used, but it often has a sour, spicy, and sweet, savory taste.

Common ingredients in Yam Talay include shrimp, squid, fish, chili peppers, and lime juice. This dish is typically served with rice and can be garnished with fresh cilantro. While Yam Talay is often enjoyed as a main course, it can also be served as an appetizer or side dish.


83. Yam Woon Sen (Mungbean Noodle Salad)

Yam woon sen is a type of Thai noodle salad that is made with clear mung bean noodles, vegetables, and a variety of meats. The dish is typically served chilled or at room temperature, making it perfect for hot summer days.

Yam woon sen can be enjoyed on its own as a light meal or snack, or it can be served as a side dish alongside grilled meats or stir-fried vegetables. While the dish is traditionally made with pork, chicken, and shrimp, feel free to experiment with different meats and vegetables to create your own unique yam woon sen.

Recipe: Yum Woon Sen Recipe by thaitable

Yam Woon Sen

. . .

Some of the names might confuse you, but as you can see, food from Thailand is one of the best cuisines in the world. The dishes’ different influences, coming both locally and from other countries, helped shape Thai cuisine to what we know and love today.

So the next time you’re looking for new tastes to add to your bucket list, These popular Thai foods will surely be a culinary experience you’ll never forget.

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